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  • March 16th, 2015
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  • Comments Off on Negotiating Difficult Life Transitions
  • Ted

Life is a process of beginnings and endings. Both in life and nature, there are times when things move slowly and do not seem to have changed much. Then suddenly, things change quickly. Moving from August to September, the weather changes gradually at first, and then it seems that suddenly summer is over. The same happens in our lives, the transitions are as natural as the changing seasons.

Life Transitions are difficult because they force us to let go of the familiar and face the future with a sense of vulnerability. Most of the transitions of life begins with a series of losses:? The loss of a role? The loss of a person? The loss of a place? The loss of a sense of your place in the world Any significant loss makes most people feel fear and anxiety. From now on its future may be full of questions, it is normal to feel fear. We live in a culture that has taught us to be very uncomfortable with uncertainty, so we are anxious when disrupt our lives. On the positive side, these transitions give us the opportunity to learn about our strengths and explore what you really want out of life. This time of reflection may lead to a sense of renewal, stability, and a new equilibrium. A life transition can be positive or negative, planned or unplanned. Some transitions occur without warning and can be quite dramatic, as in cases of accidents, death, divorce, job loss or serious illness.

  • October 11th, 2013
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  • Comments Off on Assertive Communication
  • Ted

Most of us know that assertiveness will give you even more in life to be passive or aggressive. But few of us really are taught to be assertive. a Those are some helpful tips. 1. Choose the right time. Imagine you're running down the hall on his way to a meeting. Lisa happens. You call out, "Can you have Microsoft Project on Tuesday?" Since not scheduled a special time to raise the issue, Lisa has no reason to believe that your request deserves high priority.

2. Choose the right place. Discuss important issues in a private, neutral. 3. Be direct. For example, "Lisa, I would like to work overtime in Microsoft Project." Whether or not Lisa likes his application, he is respected for his candor. 4. "I", not "us." Instead of saying, "We plan until Tuesday," he says, "I would like to complete the project by Tuesday." 5.

Be specific. Instead, "put a rush on the Microsoft project," he says, "I would like the proposed Microsoft on the desktop and Joe finishing at 9:00 on Tuesday morning. "6. Use body language to emphasize his words." Lisa, I need that report Tuesday morning, " is a strong statement. But if this statement through his teeth as he looked to the ground, that undermine his message. 7. Confirm your order. Ask your staff to take notes in meetings. At the end of each meeting, ask your group to repeat details were agreed. This minimizes miscommunication. 8. Stand up for yourself.